Tag Archives: Laurie Winslow Sargent

CandyLand, AGAIN? Making Preschool Games More Fun

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When child #3 wanted to play Candy Land, my eyes glazed over at the thought of playing that preschool game for the umpteenth time.

Then I found two ways to spice up the fun.

Candy Land

“Mom, can we play Candy Land? Please?”

Tyler and Aimee had already worn out our first game box. It had fallen apart at the seams, and the brightly colored cards were bent and faded. As I had thrown it away, I’d muttered aloud that Elisa (then three) could surely live without it, couldn’t she?

However, Tyler’s fourteen-year-old friend heard me and said plaintively, “Every kid needs Candy Land!”

Do you know that Candy Land was introduced in 1949, created by a woman in San Diego California who wanted to entertain children afflicted with polio? See The History of Candy Land.

I reluctantly bought a fresh game for Elisa for Christmas.

Once again I found myself impatiently drumming my fingers on the board with the rainbow-colored trail, desperately hoping for a Queen Frostine card so I could race to the end and out of candy country. I’d already tried my trick of stacking the deck–putting the picture cards in the top one-third. But Elisa was getting the good ones, and I the duds.

What is it, I wondered, that makes this game so appealing to kids? The image of a sweet fantasyland is no doubt a big draw. Willie Wonka’s chocolate factory had similar appeal.

Candy Land makes preschoolers feel quite clever playing board game like their big siblings, Mom and Dad. It excites them to recognize colors and practice counting skills. And there’s the suspense: Will the next card send you all the way back to Plumpy, to start all over again?

For me, suspense had long ago given way to yawns. I decided to try a new version. At first this meant our little gingerbread place markers, when passing each other on the board, shook their plastic hand and had very fine, squeaky conversations with each other.

Then I invented Color-I-Spy. While playing the game, when drawing a new card we would also do this:  find an object in the room containing the matching color–no repeating objects. (For purple and orange we looked on CD covers.)

This turned out to be a great way to play a table game with a wiggly child. Cruising the room for matching objects requires movement and imagination. It also offered vocabulary building: “Look, Mom! There’s some red on that globe in South America!”

A preschooler always learns a whole lot more from a table game than you know–how to sequence, match colors, count spaces, etc.  In fact, any game is fun for parents to play when we pay attention to our child’s developmental milestones–perhaps with round one of the game your child can’t yet count spaces, and the next he can.

But also stimulating his imagination makes playing more fun. And it doesn’t hurt that it will make it a whole lot more fun–after endless repetitions of the game — for Mom (or Dad, or Grandma) too!

See this adorable video review of Candy Land: My 4-year-old’s favorite game. It really makes me miss it now and look forward to playing it as a Grandma someday!

[This story is an excerpt from The Power of Parent-Child Play, page 148. © 2003 Laurie Winslow Sargent, published by Tyndale House. For reprint permission, please contact the author.]

Have you found any fun ways to adapt table games to make them more fun? Share your tips in a comment below!

Free At Last! . . . or is that Three?

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When I hear “Free at last!” in the rousing speech by Martin Luther King, I admit I don’t think only of that inspiring pastor and the human rights movement.

I also think of my daughter Aimee’s 3rd birthday.

Free at Last!Back in the ’90’s when Aimee was two and her older brother six, one of our favorite CDs was by the group DC Talk.

Our church was less than a mile away from home in our tiny town of South Bend, Washington. But if on the way home a song we liked was blaring out our speakers, my husband would  drive up and around hills and through neighborhoods as we all loudly sang along.

This also involved a lot of posturing and what I called “finger and head dancing”. (There is only so much you can do when strapped into a car seat.)

Our favorite song was Free at Last. It had a humorous off-key opening (which can most likely be heard in any small church congregation) and the “free at last” passage from Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech. Most of the song was upbeat Christian rap, featuring the singer known now as TobyMac. Our car rides were so much fun (we also danced crazily with the kids in our living room) that the song Free at Last became a family favorite.

So of course when we realized that at that age Aimee counted this way—one, two, free, four—I couldn’t resist putting up the sign (see image above) on her birthday, when she was finally “free at last!”

The only thing missing from this video is better sound quality, and the car-dancing Sargent family:

How Do I Stop My Kids’ Fighting?

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By Laurie Winslow Sargent:

One frustrated mom asked, “How I stop my kids’ fighting? It’s driving me crazy!”


Photo by Stuart Miles: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Ooooh, been there, done that, felt that. I know, it can be enormously frustrating. I think what  made me craziest was the noise level–just having to listen to it.

Even handling it perfectly (and how would that be?) won’t make it go away entirely. Kids are learning how to relate to each other and will practice with their siblings.

As we enter this discussion on sibling squabbles, ask yourself this:  “What am I most reacting to?” Is the answer:

#1 The noise?

#2 The issues at hand, which you feel you must intervene in (and should you–really–or must they work it out themselves?)

#3 The need to protect one child from another, physically or from wounding words?

Kids pick at each other for all kinds of reasons and many do require adult intervention (AKA refereeing). But for this first post on kids’ fighting, let’s examine your own attitude as a parent, as I was forced to examine mine.

Is it possible that your interventions in kids’ fighting sometimes make things worse?  Consider your:

(CLICK to cont. for 6 Ways parent attitudes can affect kids’ fighting…)

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Are We There Yet? 3 tricks to help kids travel (more) patiently

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By Laurie Winslow Sargent:

How do you keep your sanity when traveling kids whine, “Are we there yet?” Here are 3 ways to keep them occupied, so they travel more patiently and pleasantly.

How do you keep kids from whining, “How much farther?”           Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today I had to lay still for half an hour for a simple medical test, but couldn’t see a clock. To pass the time (and distract myself from moving) I played an old mind game, Count the Music, which I played with my kids on long road trips.

Try this, plus two more ways to keep your own kids occupied as you drive:

Way#1: Count the Music

Consider that most songs on the radio are 3-4 minutes long. In your own head, take the number of minutes you expect it to take to reach your destination and divide by three. Tell the kids “We’ll be there in 7 songs,” (or whatever). They can keep track of the number of songs on their fingers.

While listening to music during my medical test, I’d calculated that would hear eight or nine songs. I only heard three, so must have dozed off while counting and focusing on the music. It tends to work the same way with kids–they either get into the music or fall asleep. It also gives them a sense for how much time is passing if they can’t grasp what “half an hour” is nor tell time.

(CLICK TO READ Way #2 and Way #3)

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A Huge Thank You for Playful Fathers

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This makes me ache for every child who has no dad to play with, or a father who is present but not available. And it makes me very thankful for my own husband who has been so wonderfully involved with our own three kids and helped them grow to become such fine grown up people.

I appreciate Igniter Media for creating this video showing the empty spaces and places left by missing fathers. It truly reveals the power of parent-child play and especially the impact of playful fathers. Visit Igniter Media’s website at  ignitermedia.com and their YouTube channel. You can also find them on Twitter as @IgniterMedia.

Links to Articles on Parenting, Faith and Writing

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I’ve neglected Parenting by Faith for awhile, but haven’t forgotten you!

I’ve been writing for Finding God Daily and Sell Your Nonfiction. I also am the editor for Finding God Daily (with Right to the Heart ministries) plus a new Christian suicide prevention site, Thinking About Suicide (which we hope will save many lives!)

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

As a consolation prize for you, I added a page to Parenting by Faith called More Articles: Other Topics.

That page has links to some of my articles not related to parenting, posted on other websites. So far I’ve added links to 27 articles written in the past year or so. I’ll eventually add links to older web archived articles originally published in print magazines or books.

You can also visit my other page here at Parenting by Faith: More Parenting Articles. That has links to my parenting articles on other sites including Focus on the Family, Christianity Today International, and CBN.)

Meanwhile I’m bursting with ideas for Parenting by Faith, and hoping for a lull in my editorial work to add more parenting tips for you here!

This week, have a lovely time with your kids. Summer parenting memories you create with your children now will be remembered by them as adults. Have FUN together!

By the way: at Finding God Daily, I post content every weekday, 52 weeks a year! Whew. That’s a lot of posts. I work with over 20 wonderful pro Christian writers and speakers from AWSA (Advanced Writers and Speakers Association). I try to add a video to every post at FGD so am always looking for awesome ones. If you know of any great ones, send me links! Even if you’ve made them yourselves! I also love leads to interesting topics or people.

Thanks for your interest in Parenting by Faith! See: Blog Posts by TopicMore Articles: Other Topics and More Parenting Articles.

Have a great day!

Laurie

Quiz to Test Parents about Child Personality Traits

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Image by renjith krishnan: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Your Child Has Personality!

This short personality quiz is excerpted from Delight in Your Child’s Design by Laurie Winslow Sargent, and was contributed by Kim Miller, Laurie’s editor at Tyndale House.

In some ways, determining your child’s personality is an inexact science.She is likely a blend of more than one personality type. A child’s relationships and experiences also influence the way she behaves.

Still, it is helpful to get some sense of why your child acts the way she does. Try to answer the following questions to see if you can discern a pattern in your child’s behavior and help you understand and identify some of his or her strongest personality traits:

1. You can truthfully say, “I’d be a millionaire if only I could bottle and sell my child’s . . .”

a. optimism.
b. persistence.
c. kindness.
d. confidence.

2. Your son keeps you up until 2 a.m. the night before his school’s science fair because:

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5-Minute-Fun with your child: Shadow Stomp

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Photo by Elisa Sargent, 2010

5-Minute-Fun: Shadow Stomp

When you’re out on a walk together or your preschooler is riding his trike as you walk,  he may lose steam before you can get back home.

Boost his motivation and energy by saying, “Don’t you dare run over my shadow!”

When he does (of course!) , scream in agony or moan.

An alternative is to play shadow tag. Try stomping on each others shadows before you can run to a place where your shadows are hidden in the shade of a tree or car.

It’s amazing how a kid who cries “Carry me, Mom, I’m too tired!” and slumps to the ground to demonstrate his exhaustion is suddenly energized by a game like this, then can easily make it all the way back home!

Enjoy the Spring weather . . . now that it’s finally here!

By the way: take a close look at the photo above. My 13-yr-old daughter photographed her friends spelling out the word LOVE with heart-shaped shadows below.   How cool is that?

She loved to run over my shadow when she was little!

Laurie

http://www.ParentChildPlay.com

Note: This 5-Minute-Fun was excerpted from:  Time to Get Out? Or Stay In!, Chapter 13, p. 193 in The Power of Parent-Child Play by Laurie Winslow Sargent (2003, Tyndale House Publishers).